Norwegian Genealogy

Norwegian research is fairly easy once you get the hang of it. Records go back to the 1500s for most places. The trick often is finding where yout=r immigrant ancestor came from in Norway. I recently wrote an article showing how I tracked a cousin’s immigrant ancestor from Brooklyn, NY back to Rogaland – http://blog.kittycooper.com/2017/10/finding-your-immigrant-ancestor-in-norway/

Getting Starting on Norwegian Genealogy

One of the best introductions to doing Norwegian family history research is at familysearch.org
https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Norway

Click here for Rootsweb’s Norway page which has many useful links and articles.

There is a very helpful blog by Norwegian genealogist Martin Roe Eidhammer that has many good posts on naming, gothic handwriting, bygedebooks, and a genealogy Norwegian word list at http://martinroe.com/blog/ 

Another good article on basic Norwegian genealogy research is Why Your Norwegian Ancestor Probably Wasn’t a Viking King

These posts on my site here are also helpful for doing Norwegian Genealogy:

DNA

And there is a Norwegian DNA project at Family Tree DNA, among other information, it has a good page explaining Norwegian naming:
http://www.norwaydna.no/gedcoms-and-genealogy/norwegian-names-en/

Helpers

Local history books – Bygdebøker

DICTIONARIES and translating

HISTORY

Norwegian Emigration website
http://www.norwayheritage.com/

Here is a nice one page summary of Norwegian history:
http://houseofnorway.net/History%20of%20Norway.html

And a wonderful article on why so many Norwegians emigrated to the USA in the mid to late 1800s (I have heard that there are more Norwegian Americans than citizens of Norway):
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2014/09/11/1328867/-Peace-Potatoes-and-Pox-Norwegian-Emigration-in-the-1800s?showAll=yes#

5 Comments

5 thoughts on “Norwegian Genealogy

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  1. Thanks for your kind words about my blog. It is highly appreciated. I had to smile when I saw it, as it just so happens that a link to your blog is included in one of my articles that is scheduled to be published shortly. Have a nice evening! ☺

  2. Thank you very much for your kind offer to proof read. I will certainly keep that in mind. I know that my English is not perfect, but I always keep it in mind and try to get better.
    I like to think of blogging like a dialog and if we were to speak together you would clearly hear that English is not my native language.
    One of my American friends are a really good writer (not proffesional). If I mess up too much he is on me through Facebook or Skype and goes “Listen Martin” I use to reply something like “Ok, do your thing, but leave a little bit of me in it. 🙂
    Brw; If I when I wrote and scheduled my posting at http://martinroe.com/blog/index.php/2016/03/10/blogs-i-read/ had known that you would mention my blog, I would of course put the link to you at the top 🙂

    • It is lovely that we read each others’ blogs.
      By the way re Bygdebuk, I think one can request a 6 month research membership from the USA. I plan to try that and blog about it in a few weeks. Currently I just take photos of the pages of my families in the FHL when I visit my Dad and brother in Salt Lake City

  3. That sounds very interesting. I know that access from outside Norway are granted under certain conditions. I look forward to learn about your experience. Hopyfully you will let me include a comment in my article, of course, with a link to your blog.
    Funny you should mention SLC,Utah; My friend (who’s name is also Martin lives in West Jordan UT. He is the Master Trollogist of the USA he has a blog at http://martinstrollcave.blogspot.no/ Even though I am not that fascinated by trolls I think his trollstories are fun.
    Oops; it’s passed midnight in Norway, I’d better wake up my wife who most likely is asleep in front of the TV and then get to bed. Have a nice evening 🙂

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